lnsee:

xrxxxx:

Saint Crispin’s Trunk show

23rd - 24th September 2014

Phillip from Saint Crispin’s returns to conduct made-to-measure fittings at the newest Armoury Landmark store.

Yowza. Here comes Saint Crispins - trunkshow tomorrow and day after (23 and 24 September)

stevenonoja:

New Post - Since I’m working full time as a blogger and my evenings are always jam-packed with things to get done.
Fall Denim
Website / Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

stevenonoja:

New Post - Since I’m working full time as a blogger and my evenings are always jam-packed with things to get done.

Fall Denim

Website / Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

(via punkmonsieur)

yolowastaken:

Cigar Monday • Alden Plaza Last Wingtip Boot #leathersoul #menstyle #menswear #alden #plazalast #shellcordovan #shoeporn #wingtips #wingtipboot #horween #nn07 #cigarshellcordovan

yolowastaken:

Cigar Monday • Alden Plaza Last Wingtip Boot #leathersoul #menstyle #menswear #alden #plazalast #shellcordovan #shoeporn #wingtips #wingtipboot #horween #nn07 #cigarshellcordovan

tastefullyoffensive:

[poorlydrawnlines]
putthison:

Q and Answer: How to Properly Untie a Tie
Shawn writes: I feel like I’ve read a million articles on ways to tie a tie (I stick to the trusty double-four-in-hand), but none on the proper way to untie one. Any suggestions? Haphazardly yanking the back blade through the knot is starting to take its toll on the stitching.
You’re right to not want to yank it off. Hastily pulling on your ties not only ruins the stitching, but more importantly, the interlining sandwiched inside. If done enough times, you’ll find that it can be increasingly difficult to get a good knot and dimple. 
The best way to untie a tie is to simply reverse the process you used to tie it. I personally loosen mine a bit until I can slip it off of my head, and then manually undo the knot with my fingers. Once done, I hang it on a hook for a day or two, so that the wrinkles fall out naturally. 
Granted, this isn’t as sexy as what you see in the movies — where some suit and tie guy comes home and throws his jacket on the bed, then rips his tie off in a seemingly reverse lasso move — but it helps preserve the tie until a meatball rolls down it and ruins it for good. 
If you do find that the interlining is starting to give way, there are some services you can use to replace it. Some makers, such as Drake’s, will replace the interlining for a small fee (although, I’ve heard this is only done for their best customers, as it’s a time intensive process). For men in the US, there’s also a TieCrafters, which is the best tie repair and recrafting service I know of. They’re not inexpensive — especially if you have to account for shipping — but they can be a good way to help preserve your favorite pieces of neckwear. 
(Photo via Mr. Porter)

putthison:

Q and Answer: How to Properly Untie a Tie

Shawn writes: I feel like I’ve read a million articles on ways to tie a tie (I stick to the trusty double-four-in-hand), but none on the proper way to untie one. Any suggestions? Haphazardly yanking the back blade through the knot is starting to take its toll on the stitching.

You’re right to not want to yank it off. Hastily pulling on your ties not only ruins the stitching, but more importantly, the interlining sandwiched inside. If done enough times, you’ll find that it can be increasingly difficult to get a good knot and dimple. 

The best way to untie a tie is to simply reverse the process you used to tie it. I personally loosen mine a bit until I can slip it off of my head, and then manually undo the knot with my fingers. Once done, I hang it on a hook for a day or two, so that the wrinkles fall out naturally. 

Granted, this isn’t as sexy as what you see in the movies — where some suit and tie guy comes home and throws his jacket on the bed, then rips his tie off in a seemingly reverse lasso move — but it helps preserve the tie until a meatball rolls down it and ruins it for good. 

If you do find that the interlining is starting to give way, there are some services you can use to replace it. Some makers, such as Drake’s, will replace the interlining for a small fee (although, I’ve heard this is only done for their best customers, as it’s a time intensive process). For men in the US, there’s also a TieCrafters, which is the best tie repair and recrafting service I know of. They’re not inexpensive — especially if you have to account for shipping — but they can be a good way to help preserve your favorite pieces of neckwear. 

(Photo via Mr. Porter)

parisiangentleman:

(via Men and Their Clothes — What Women Think | Parisian Gentleman)
punkmonsieur:

underwoodsapprentice:

Underwoodsapprentice.tumblr.com

dapper 

punkmonsieur:

underwoodsapprentice:

Underwoodsapprentice.tumblr.com

dapper 

suitsupply:

Start the week off right with this double-breasted Madison suit cut from a blend of alpaca wool and cotton by Ferla. Keep it simple and let the suit do the talking by adding a solid white shirt & a navy knit tie.  http://bit.ly/1qZbKSU

suitsupply:

Start the week off right with this double-breasted Madison suit cut from a blend of alpaca wool and cotton by Ferla. Keep it simple and let the suit do the talking by adding a solid white shirt & a navy knit tie.  http://bit.ly/1qZbKSU

ramenshamanla:

I’m convinced miso is the hardest flavor to master. The divide between the best misos and your run of the mill bowls (like this spicy miso at Munro in Shin-Okubo) is bigger than that between average American and Japanese girls. Only with less fat involved.

I’ve never had anything even close to the quality of Kururi, Sumire, or Eki. But Junren is still lurking out there…